What does not playing with a full deck?

The phrase 'not playing with a full deck' is a phrase which suggests that somebody 'is missing a screw' or 'not all there' and so on. Example of use: “I saw a lady running naked down the street, clearly she's not playing with a full deck.”
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What is not playing with a full deck mean?

to not be completely honest in a contest or discussion, and therefore have an unfair advantage over other people. This guy is either very clever or he's not playing with a full deck.
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What is a full deck?

1. To have the full faculties of one's mind; to be completely sane. Usually used in negative constructions.
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What type of figurative language is not playing with a full deck?

Not mentally sound; crazy or mentally deranged.
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What does the idiom on the ball mean?

C1. to be quick to understand and react to things: I didn't sleep well last night and I'm not really on the ball today.
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What does not playing with a full deck mean?



What does straight from the horse's mouth mean?

From a reliable source, on the best authority. For example, I have it from the horse's mouth that he plans to retire next month. Also put as straight from the horse's mouth, this expression alludes to examining a horse's teeth to determine its age and hence its worth. [ 1920s]
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What does missed the boat mean?

Fail to take advantage of an opportunity, as in Jean missed the boat on that club membership. This expression, which alludes to not being in time to catch a boat, has been applied more widely since the 1920s. 2. Fail to understand something, as in I'm afraid our legislator missed the boat on that amendment to the bill.
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What is hyperbole and onomatopoeia?

Onomatopoeia is sound words; words that sound like the thing they represent. Examples: bark, buzz, hoot, growl, etc. Onomatopoeia. Hyperbole is a huge exaggeration. Example: Our ice-cream cones are a mile high!
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What is an example of a hyperbole?

Those who hear or read the hyperbole should understand that it is an exaggeration. You've probably heard common hyperboles in everyday conversations such as “I'm so hungry, I could eat a horse,” “I've seen this movie a hundred times,” or “It cost an arm and a leg.”
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What are two examples of a metaphor?

A metaphor is a literary device that imaginatively draws a comparison between two unlike things.
  • “Bill is an early bird.”
  • “Life is a highway.”
  • “Her eyes were diamonds.”
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How many cards are in a deck?

Deck of Cards Questions - There are 52 cards in a standard deck of cards - There are 4 of each card (4 Aces, 4 Kings, 4 Queens, etc.)
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Have all hands on deck meaning?

: of, relating to, or being a situation in which every available person is needed or called to assist an all-hands-on-deck effort "Overwhelmingly the response I heard is that we need an all-hands-on-deck approach to stopping the spread of COVID-19 in Wisconsin," [Governor Tony] Evers said.—
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How many Clubs are in a deck of cards?

A standard 52-card deck comprises 13 ranks in each of the four French suits: clubs (♣), diamonds (♦), hearts (♥) and spades (♠). Each suit includes three court cards (face cards), King, Queen and Jack, with reversible (double-headed) images.
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What does a sandwich short of a picnic mean?

The expression 'one sandwich short of a picnic' can be used in a humorous way to refer to someone who is crazy or stupid. For example: John is one sandwich short of a picnic. He gave up a job in a big bank to live in a caravan.
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What does it mean to play hardball?

Act aggressively and ruthlessly, as in It's only a month before the election, and I'm sure they'll start to play hardball. This term originated in baseball, where it alludes to using the standard ball as opposed to the slightly larger and minimally softer ball of softball.
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What does biting off more than you can chew mean?

Take on more work or a bigger task than one can handle, as in With two additional jobs, Bill is clearly biting off more than he can chew. Cautions against taking on too much appear in medieval sources, although this particular metaphor, alluding to taking in more food than one can chew, dates only from about 1870.
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What is an example of a synecdoche?

What are some examples of synecdoche? Here are some examples of synecdoche: the word hand in "offer your hand in marriage"; mouths in "hungry mouths to feed"; and wheels referring to a car.
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What is an example of metonymy?

Metonymy refers to a figure of speech in which the word for one thing is used to refer to something related to that thing, such as crown for “king” or “queen,” or White House or Oval Office for “President.” The phrase “a bunch of suits” for a group of businesspeople is an example of metonymy; it uses the common ...
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What is an example of an antithesis?

Consider William Shakespeare's famous line in Hamlet: “Give every man thy ear, but few thy voice.” This is a great example of antithesis because it pairs two contrasting ideas—listening and speaking—in the same parallel structure. The effect of antithesis can be powerful.
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What are similes metaphors personification alliteration and onomatopoeia called?

The term figurative language covers a wide range of literary devices and techniques, a few of which include:
  • Simile.
  • Metaphor.
  • Personification.
  • Onomatopoeia.
  • Oxymoron.
  • Hyperbole.
  • Allusion.
  • Idiom.
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Is alliteration a form of figurative language?

Alliteration. Many experts also consider alliteration an example of figurative language, even though it does not involve figures of speech. Rather, alliteration is a sound device that layers some additional meaning on top of the literal language of the text.
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Is allusion a type of figurative language?

Allusion is not figurative language. An allusion is a reference to a previously published piece of literature that the author would like to mention in...
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Why do we say foot the bill?

Often, the term foot the bill is used when someone is being generous or taking responsibility for an enormous debt. The idiom foot the bill is derived from an earlier idiom first used in the 1500s: foot up. This phrase meant to add up the figures on a document and come to a total at the foot of the bill.
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Why do they say hit the sack?

The assumption is that hit the hay and hit the sack come from the fact that mattresses used to consist of cloth sacks stuffed with hay. Some historians go so far as to suggest that hit the hay and hit the sack come from the practice of fluffing up the hay inside the mattress ticking before lying down to sleep.
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What is the meaning of it cost an arm and a leg?

Definition of cost an arm and a leg

informal. : to be too expensive I want a new car that doesn't cost an arm and a leg.
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